Stubaital Valley

Valley Life: Stubaital

Irene Heisz

Witty and sharp-tongued, Irene Heisz is a journalist and author who... View author

The dialect of the inhabitants of Fulpmes in the Stubai Valley, with its penchant for exotic language variants, is a never-ending source of joy for other Tiroleans. The following example would never reach print in a formal newspaper, but amply demonstrates the point: „A Fulpmerer Rennradlfahrer isch in Berg auigetretn und oigebrettert. Und unten hat er vergessn zu bremsn.“ (In other words, a cyclist from Fulpmes sped down the mountain on his bike. At the bottom, he forgot to brake.) The captivating beauty of this story is not the substantive aspect of a nasty recreational accident, but the fact that it includes a huge amount of “r”s. And you can tell when someone is from Fulpmes by the way he rolls his r’s – in a manner not dissimilar to the American drawl.

Stubaital, often simply referred to as Stubai, branches away from the Wipptal Valley at Schönberg and is home to not only exceptionally beautiful landscapes with spectacular summer and winter sporting opportunities, but also a globally successful metalworking industry, whose roots go back to the Middle Ages. „Stubai Werkzeuge“ (Stubai Tools) is a cooperative umbrella brand, to which over 20 companies throughout the valley belong, that exports products ranging from bricklayer’s trowels to diagonal cutters and supplies parts to the mining industry in some 60 countries. Highly skilled workers make the parts exclusively in Tirol. Around 500 people in total work for Stubai.

As one would expect, the services of ski instructors and mountain guides are also in demand: views of the glaciated valley head can even be seen from Schönberg. And you have to visit Mount Serles, the 2,717 metre “High Altar of Tirol” at least once in your life. According to the locals, it is best enjoyed at sunrise.

Sunrise on the Serles

Sunrise on the Serles: no later than when the first tentative rays of sunshine bathe the surrounding mountain peaks in light, it becomes clear that the efforts of the ascent were worthwhile.


This summer, I wrote about the various Tirolean valleys and told stories of so much life in so little space in the series “Valley Life“. I want to introduce visitors from all over the world to Tirol and open local people’s eyes to the very special aspects of their otherwise familiar environment.

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